principal: pedro geleris FRAIA

Our approach is to work closely with the client to develop the initial architectural brief. Each project is approached as a unique design problem and we believe in investing effort in the early stages of a project to develop a successful design that fulfills the client's brief.
This project involved the alterations and additions of a modest brick residence built in 1951.
The project involved alterations and additions to a modest holiday coast house built in 1973. The client wanted to improve the existing amenities and bedrooms and to extend the living spaces whilst still keeping the character of a holiday house.The block is located on the headland between Circuit Beach and Lilli Pilli Beach. It is surrounded by a Spotted Gum forest and has wonderful views to the ocean and surrounding headlands.Though 75% of the existing building was retained the additions and alterations have transformed it into a contemporary holiday house that takes advantage of its setting and ocean views.Downstairs, the entry and stair access was switched from the middle of the house to the front to present a more visible entrance and to rationalize internal access to the guest rooms.Upstairs, the flat roof to the living areas was replaced with a new raked ceiling + large overhanging eaves. This large roof provides the setting for the open plan kitchen, dining and lounge areas. The large floor-to-ceiling glazing extends the space onto the new deck and beyond to the surrounding forest and ocean views.
The brief was to design a contemporary house for a young family where all the main living areas are on street level with the garage and storage facilities below and the guest facilities above
reid house
This small project in Braddon involved alterations and additions to a charming 1930’s Californian Bungalow that sits within a beautiful garden setting.
The project is a new house in the established suburb of Braddon, in an area not listed as heritage. Nevertheless, we sought to reflect, in a contemporary way, qualities of the original houses in the suburb with elements such as the formal covered entry porch.
This pavilion is the second project on this block done by this practice, refer ‘Braddon House’. For this new project, the owner asked us to design a pavilion that was to become the final compositional piece in an already beautiful garden.
The project involved the transformation of a house that was compromised by difficult access, poor finishes, and an out-of-proportion facade.
The project involved alterations and additions to an A.V Jennings brick cottage built in 1967. The clients’ brief asked to upgrade the existing amenities and to provide new spaces such as a retreat, study and master bedroom. There was also a need to better connect with the garden and to take advantage of views to the parkland across the road.
The pavilion is the expressive element of this project responding to the active communal life of the family. The rake of the roof draws in the northern sunlight and abundant natural light into the space. At the eastern end, the roof folds upwards over the veranda to let in the morning sun and orient the view towards the pool.
Ainslie House
This project involved the design of a free-standing studio within a beautiful garden with established trees.It was designed as a single space, articulated by raked ceiling and windows, a split floor level and seemingly floating joinery. The full-height windows surround the space taking in garden views and abundant natural light.The studio is fully self-contained with a kichenette and bathroom. It is also integrated with a new carport and garden shed.
The project is an extension of an existing residence in Griffith. It involved the addition of a parents’ retreat at the rear of the house to enjoy the northern sun and views to the garden. It includes a link space and a master bedroom with an ensuite and a walk-in-robe room.The owners had previously done contemporary additions to this house and wanted the new work to be sympathetic. It blended with elements of the existing to create a seamless yet fresh addition to an already lovely house.
Hackett House
The project was an alteration and addition to an existing house in Griffith. The work involved:A new quilter’s studio above a new double garage A new entry courtyard above a new cellar A new kitchen, andA garden pavilion at the back of the houseThe quilter’s studio was designed as a sculptural element with blade walls and deeply recessed windows. Its form somewhat mirrors the existing bedroom wing on the opposite side of the courtyard. The wooden shutters to the front control the western sun and give privacy from the street.Its northern façade looks onto the new courtyard and draws wonderful light into the studio. This façade incorporates a water feature and creates a welcoming entrance to the house.The owners are keen gardeners and the new modest pavilion has become a much loved and used space for relaxation.
The original house is a red brick cottage built in the late 1950s. As with many houses built in that era, the bathroom and laundry were placed at the back of the house creating a barrier between living rooms and backyard. The owners wanted to remove that barrier and link with the garden through a new wing with pavilions for a parents’ retreat and a master bedroom. The demolition of walls and the addition of the new wing were the catalyst for transformation. It reconfigured the backyard to create a series of new outdoor spaces accessible from the house. The prime space is the Central Garden incorporating outdoor dining, a magnificent fruit tree as the centrepiece of the space and a private courtyard for the parents.The new wing houses the replacement bathroom and laundry, an ensuite and walk-in-robe area and the passageway that links the two pavilions. The pavilions are surrounded by gardens and, through the raked skillion roofs, enjoy abundant natural light and the warm winter sun.
This project involved alterations and additions to a house in Narrabundah. The original house was a modest cottage built in 1952. Over the years, it had a number of alterations to meet the changing needs of the previous owners and, in the process, changed its original character.
Wallaroo House
The project involved alterations and additions to an existing residence in Campbell:
The owners love spending time in the garden and enjoy their outlook to the park across the road. As a result, the relationship between the building and the landscape was important in the design. New landscaping, stone blade walls, steps and paving now provide easy access through to the new front entrance. Nestled between this path and retaining walls is a new private space with a timber deck and a lovely garden.
The project involved the alteration and addition to an architect designed Aranda House built in 1970.
The project is a new house in the established suburb of Red Hill.